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Diabetes Forecast

The Healthy Living Magazine

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia refers to the condition of having a high level of glucose in the bloodstream. This can occur when the body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its insulin supply appropriately. Everyone with type 1 and type 2 diabetes has experienced hyperglycemia. A primary goal of diabetes treatment is to reduce blood glucose levels to as close to normal as possible. If left untreated for a long period of time, hyperglycemia can result in complications of diabetes such as kidney disease and retinopathy.

Maintaining a normal concentration of blood glucose is key, so people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes need to check their blood glucose levels as advised by their health care providers. A few approaches to lowering persistently high glucose include being more physically active, altering a person's meal plan, or adjusting the dosage of diabetes medications.

People with type 1 diabetes are completely insulin deficient, and their bodies may therefore produce ketones as hyperglycemia sets in, especially if the blood glucose level exceeds 240 mg/dl. This can lead to a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis, which constitutes a medical emergency. Symptoms of this life-threatening complication are nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, shortness of breath, deep, rapid breathing, and a fruity smell to the breath. A person with type 1 diabetes should test their urine for ketones when his or her blood glucose rises above 240 mg/dl, and should notify a medical professional if ketones are persistently elevated.

 
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Red Striders Walk With Pride

Meet Rhiana Wynn, age 8, of Saugus, Calif. She's participating in this year's Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes®, as a Red Strider. Red Striders are people with diabetes who participate in the event. Rhiana steps out to encourage other people with diabetes and to meet other kids like her. Learn more about why other Red Striders step out. Read more >