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Diabetes Forecast

The Healthy Living Magazine

Blood Glucose

Glucose is a type of sugar used as the primary source of energy for the human body. Your body gets glucose when you eat foods that contain it; when your liver produces it; or from storage packages in the body called glycogen. Glucose travels through the body via the bloodstream. Your blood glucose level tells you how much glucose you have in your bloodstream. Normal fasting blood glucose levels are between 70 and 100; normal post-meal glucose levels are less than 140.

The fasting blood glucose is the blood glucose concentration after not eating for at least 8 hours (usually taken before eating in the morning) and is used to assess whether a person has diabetes. The A1C is an estimate of a person's average blood glucose over the previous three months and can be converted into an eAG, estimated average blood glucose. These values are used to monitor blood glucose in people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends that a person with diabetes aim for an A1C below 7 percent, which corresponds to an eAG below 154 mg/dl.

Checking Blood Glucose: Why using that meter can be a key part of your plan for long-term health

 
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Get to Know

Red Striders Walk With Pride

Meet Rhiana Wynn, age 8, of Saugus, Calif. She's participating in this year's Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes®, as a Red Strider. Red Striders are people with diabetes who participate in the event. Rhiana steps out to encourage other people with diabetes and to meet other kids like her. Learn more about why other Red Striders step out. Read more >