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Diabetes Forecast

The Healthy Living Magazine

Product Guide: Injection Aids

18 devices that make injections easier

By Lindsey Wahowiak ,

With more types of insulin and non-insulin injectables on the market, taking shots is part of many people’s diabetes management regimen. There’s a wide world of products designed to make managing injections easier for people with. As you browse, look for handy symbols to discover tools created with common problems in mind:

Vision issues

Dexterity issues

Fear of needles

Pain Relief

Buzzy (MMJ Labs)
A perennial (and cute) presence in the Consumer Guide, Buzzy is a vibrating tool with a cold pack that, when placed on the skin, distracts the nerves from the sensation of a needle prick. It’s available in three model sizes and patterns. Buzzy can also be ordered with DistrACTION pack cards, which can help kids focus away from a needle.


Shotblocker (Bionix)
This flexible plastic disk has blunt spines on its underside, surrounding a gap in the disk where an injection can be administered. Pressing the Shotblocker into the skin dulls the sensation of an injection. Bionix sells it only in boxes of 50 or 100, but available as a single unit from other distributors.

Magnification


Insul-Eze (AmbiMed)
The Insul-Eze holds both insulin vial and syringe in place for maximum ease of use. It also magnifies the scale on syringes two times to make measuring doses easier. It works with most insulin vials and holds 30-, 50-, and 100-unit syringes. The device is latex free.



Magni-Guide (BD)
The Magni-Guide is both a syringe-scale magnifier and needle guide. By connecting a vial of insulin and a syringe to the device, it holds both in place while magnifying the scale on the syringe 1.7 times. Note that Eli Lilly vials fit the Magni-Guide best, while other brands may be loose or tight, which can cause the device to crack.
[Icon: Dexterity, Vision]


Syringe Magnifier (Apothecary Products)
This device clips onto syringes to help you see dosage markings clearly. It works easily with ½ and 1 unit syringes. Apothecary products are only available in bulk.

Dosing Aids


Count-a-Dose (Prodigy)
To make insulin measurement easier for people with vision impairment, including those who are blind, the Count-a-Dose measures a single unit of insulin at a time, audibly clicking with each unit drawn. The device can hold one or two vials of insulin and includes raised bumps to differentiate between the two. The device works with any brand of insulin, but only with BD’s 50-unit syringe.


Safe Shot (Borin-Halbich)
The Safe Shot Infusion Device allows users to preset it for easier measurement of insulin. Loading a syringe into the device helps limit the amount of insulin that can be drawn.


Tartoos (Visual Medical)
More than just cute temporary tattoos, Tartoos, or “targeted tattoos,” help users rotate injection sites. Twenty images are printed on a 4.5- by 6.5-inch sheet, which users can transfer to their abdomen or other injection site. When it’s time to give a dose, an antiseptic wipe removes the spot to inject—helping users know to skip that spot for their next injection. In four designs. 


Jerry the Bear (Sproutel)
Designed to make learning about diabetes fun and less scary for children, Jerry, a stuffed bear (who retails for $149), teaches kids to test blood glucose, make healthy food choices, and even give a pretend dose of insulin, thanks to the toy’s interactive components. Jerry models are available to cover food allergies and general health and wellness, too.

Safety Issues


Securitee Blanket (Regato Enterprises Ltd.)
Described by one user as “a little yoga mat” for your insulin vial, the Securitee Blanket is a snug cozy that makes vials both easier to hold onto and partially protected from impact when dropped. It comes in three sizes and five colors.


Vial Safe
Vial Safe comes in a single or double pack of 100 percent silicone jackets to fit over 10 milliliter insulin vials, preventing breakage. Each jacket has a window so labels are still visible, helping to avoid insulin mix-ups.


Insul-Cap (AmbiMed)
The Insul-Cap tops an insulin vial to help the user safely and easily load a syringe. The plastic cap helps guide the needle to avoid breaking and comes in a two pack with different colors to identify different types of insulin. 


Injection Safety Guard (Apothecary Products)
This small plastic disk fits over the neck of most insulin vials to prevent accidental jabs on hands. Apothecary Products are only available in bulk.

Injection Aids


Insuflon (IntraPump)
For people who need multiple daily doses of insulin but want or need to limit needle sticks, the Insuflon is one option. The prescription-only introducer needle needs to be inserted into the skin only once every three days. Doses of insulin can then be given through the remaining flexible cannula. Insuflon sites need to be rotated regularly, just like other injection sites, to maintain tissue health. It is compatible with both needles and insulin pens.


Inject-Ease (AmbiMed)
This device hides a syringe and needle and spreads out sensation to dull the pain of an injection. It is used by placing a loaded syringe into the device, then depressing a button to administer insulin at the speed of the user’s choosing. Inject-Ease works with most 0.3-, 0.5-, and 1-unit syringes, and has customizable depth control.


Autoject 2 (Owen Mumford)
By hiding needles, Autoject 2 may help reduce anxiety about the sharps. Simply press a button to inject the needle to a preset depth. It works with BD syringes and most 0.3-, 0.5-, or 1-unit syringes. The device also has audible and visual cues to ensure insulin is delivered correctly.

Supply Storage


DiaSecure (Diabetes Secure)
A safe place to keep insulin pens, needles, glucose tablets, and other medication, DiaSecure keeps everything together in one device. The plastic storage system has separate areas for new and used needles, and can help users see how much insulin they have used in a day. It’s made of food-grade, dishwasher-safe plastic and comes in six colors.


Ambi-Tray (AmbiMed)
This small insulin holder keeps vials upright and in place, helping users stay organized. It fits most standard-size insulin vials.

 
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